Angora Goats

credit Oklahoma State University
Are they not just gorgeous?  I think they are adorable.






credit Angora Goat.com

credit Mohair and More


Angora: The most valuable characteristic of the Angora as compared to other goats is the value of the mohair that is clipped. The average goat in the U.S. shears approximately 5.3 pounds of mohair per shearing and are usually sheared twice a year. The mohair is very similar to wool in chemical composition but differs from wool in that it is has a much smoother surface and very thin, smooth scale. Consequently, mohair lacks the felting properties of wool. Mohair is very similar to coarse wool in the size of fiber. Mohair has been considered very valuable as an upholstering material for the making of plushes and other covering materials where strength, beauty, and durability are desired.
info credit:  home earthlink.net


 Wikipedia Mohair


angoragoat.us


hoglezoo.org

We had an uncle from North Carolina that had angora goats.  I used to love to travel there to visit him and see his goats.  They had this beautiful long hair/fur and I could just stand there and stare they were really pretty.

I am beginning to realize that I love things that have long hair.  My children, my Great Pyrenees Dog, even my own hair is still long.

These are photos from other sites because I don't own one but might want to one day.  I use the mohair well in the raw form for my clay creations.  
The raw wool pictured below from sheep.  I just received and found on ebay.






Sheep Wool

Herbal Maid Fiber Farm

"HMFF Juno" - 2014
gorgeous white wool fleece
Raw 2 lbs
3/4 Bluefaced Leicester / 1/4 Border Leicester
staple length is 6-7 inches
lots of beautiful locks
perfect for crafting, spinning, blending
Handsheared and picked through for VM
Ready to wash


I thought when I saw this wool that it would be pretty and it was clean.  So this year when I make something that needs hair or beards I will be using this raw wool.  It appears to be a little rougher in texture than the mohair from the angora goats that I have used in the past.

Well guess I need to think about these animals and do more research to see if it would be worth it to me to own one or some.  I do know that the goats are bred for their mohair and are not milk goats but I may just need this for projects.

Do any of you out there own any of these goats or sheep?

I will share on dollys' designs when I get creative in that area.  I'm stocking my online stores at the moment with handmade sewn items.
There is spring cleaning, gardening, trying out new recipes and fine tuning the old ones for my cookbook that I am going to write.  So many projects in my head not enough hours in the day.  Do you have that problem?

Have a great week!

Sharing a project that I sculpted in the 80s and used raw mohair on.




10 comments:

  1. I don't own any, Dolly, but my Uncle used to have the sheep. I can remember him shearing them and us kids helping. It always amazed me. As a kid I never paid any attention but I remember him bundling the wool into big sacks to take somewhere.
    I love goats AND sheep, too- xo Diana

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    Replies
    1. I'll bet it was fun watching and helping with the sheep shearing. I just love to watch them shear on the sheep farm behind me. Maybe one day. I laugh my oldest daughter Carly has always wanted goats. When she was so small she would say to me, "Mama, I wish we were rich so we could have goats." "Rich people have goats don't they mama?" I would say yes, because we couldn't have goats where we lived ...lol she was so cute and still loves them.

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  2. Oh these are so beautiful and the photos of the longer horned goats is almost majestic! No, there is never enough time for everything!

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    1. Hey Kathy, They are majestic I love that picture. They are pretty animals. I guess it's a good thing we don't have time because there is never a boring or dull moment!

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  3. No, but we raise lamancha dairy goats here. I just ordered myself a drop spindle kit to learn it, and to see if I want to raise something like that.

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    Replies
    1. Hey Kristina,
      If you do any of that please let me know how it goes. lamancha dairy goats I may have to find out about those too. Thanks for letting me know.

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  4. Love it..
    reminds me of the nursery song I have been singing to Tealyn. ~ Ba Ba Black sheep have you any wool yes sir yes sir three bags full..
    LOL
    Beautiful pictures...

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    Replies
    1. Hey Sweet Beautiful Marissa! It is so good to hear from you! I love it and how is beautiful little Tealyn? I've missed you and know you are having the time of your life with that little angel! xoxo

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  5. Those are just the most adorable goats! Almost fairy-tale like! :)

    xoxo laurie

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    Replies
    1. Hi Laurie! They are I agree! I would love to own one or two..I know you're busy. It is a very fun time of year.
      xoxo

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